Anxiety and Worry

I learn so much while walking the dogs.  Everywhere I look, there is something beautiful to see, something worthy to ponder.  The other day, ambling along the river on the bike path, I passed a fence painted with these words, and it set me to thinking.

It put me in mind of many a prayer, and of many a verse of Scripture.  Prayers like the one said at Mass, at the end of the Our Father:  “grant peace in our days, that, by the help of your mercy, we may always be free from sin and safe from all distress”.  An older version of this prayer reads “protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope”.  A still older one–preVatican II– asks God to keep us free “from all disturbance”.

St. Pope John Paul II said in his inauguration address in 1978 “Do not be afraid”.

So many times in the Gospels one read the words of Jesus, or of angels:  “Be not afraid”.

Jesus is with us, always.   Trust in Him will dispel fears and worries.

I was glad to see this reminder painted so strongly on someone’s fence, however secular the painter’s thoughts might have been.  Put your trust in God. Do not waste your time in worrying, in imagining catastrophe, but abide peacefully in the knowledge that God wants the best for us, and whatever happens, He will be with us every step of the way and bring goodness out of all.

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life and what you will eat, or about your body and what you will wear. For life is more than food and the body more than clothing. Notice the ravens: they do not sow or reap; they have neither storehouse nor barn, yet God feeds them.  How much more important are you than birds!  Can any of you by worrying add a moment to your life span? If even the smallest things are beyond your control, why are you anxious about the rest?”  Luke 12:22-26

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About reinkat

I am an iconographer, and have been studying Russian/Greek icons since 1995. I'm married with 3 children. I love hiking, camping, animals, my family and church--and icons.
This entry was posted in art, Catholicism, Christian Prayer, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Anxiety and Worry

  1. SR says:

    “Worry.” Kind of a disturbing word isn’t it? It takes everything away from us, doesn’t it? When I worry the first thing I notice is, my peace leave me. Then I begin to doubt my faith and trust in God. Is it where it should be, which only leads me to further guilt.

    Why do you think it is so hard for us to “trust He is always with us.” Especially in the moments we need Him the most? Doesn’t really make sense does it? You did a great job with this post. It was beautiful as is your soul, and so much to take away from it. Love you and God Bless, SR

    • reinkat says:

      I saw this post, in my mind, as a follow up to your own post about giving up all things, including misery, to Jesus, and moving on in faith and trust from there.

      • SR says:

        It is the first thing I do in the morning now, and the last at night. Totally freeing in Christ.

  2. New Things says:

    I love this, Kat. I need this picture framed and hung in my kitchen!
    Lyn

  3. Dani says:

    Perfectly said! This post reminds me of a 3-part lectures series I began with my Bible Study group last night. We watched the first segment ‘Many Faces of Fear: Exploring the Roots of Religious Fear’ by Fr. Ron Rolheiser, OMI. It’s a great video so far, and it came highly recommended. In the first part, he introduces us to the many variations of fear we have: phobias, anxieties, neuroses, fear of God, fear of death, fear of hurting others, fear of not being forgiven, etc. But in the very beginning of the video, Father Ron mentions, as you do, that in almost every instance in which God appears in the Bible, He begins with “Do not be afraid.” Right there, He tells us not to fear Him.

    Fear becomes a weight and heavy burden on us, no matter what the source. While some fear is healthy, we do not need to fear to the point in which we forget to live. We must find and embrace pleasure and enjoyment in life, not fear it or feel guilty for it. My grandmother is nearing the end of her life, and she’s miserable because for the last 25 years, she’s lived alone and in fear of aging, dying, people judging her, people harming her, etc. That’s no way to live, and it’s certainly a sad way to die.

    I could ramble on more, but I’ll end here with a yes. I agree. Life is too beautiful and too short to spend it full of worry and fear.

    • reinkat says:

      Thank you, Dani, for your thoughtful comments. Your video series sounds wonderful. I have gotten so much from the writings of Fr. Rolheiser in the past.
      I am glad that my modest post spoke to you.
      I lift your poor grandmother in prayer, and hope that she finds comfort in family and faith, and conquers her fears with the help of Our Lord.

  4. Thank you for posting this. How timely too. Found myself thinking too much about work while in church today — to the point where it seemed to close my heart to the celebration. Words to remember!

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